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  • Trace the Roots. Ask the Genes.
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Genome Compass for iOS

Genome Compass for Android

We deliver genomic discoveries to general public.

Individuals can keep track of relevant scientific discoveries at their fingertips.

There is a wide gap between scientific community and the general public. Scientific papers are written for the appreciation of only a small group of domain experts. Scientific news often target the wrong audience as many discoveries can only be applied to a subset of population of a specific genotype.

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We connect individuals, researchers and businesses through personal genome

We enable businesses, researchers to directly reach target customers with specific genotypes.

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Your privacy is our top priority.

We do not collect, store, or distribute any personal genome information or any type of personally identifying information.

Genome data are kept on user's own mobile device with password protection. No other party including our company can access these genome data without explicit approval by the user.


Latest News

  • blog slide
    Mar 20, 2014

    Specific gene variant may influence effectiveness of flu vaccine, study finds

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, flu season is here. In line with National Influenza Vaccination Week from December 7th-13th, the organization is encouraging everyone over the age of 6 months to get the annual flu vaccine. But a new study finds that a variant in a gene called IL-28B may influence the effectiveness of the vaccine. A variant in the IL-28B gene may influence the immune system's response to the annual flu vaccine, according to researchers. The research team - including Adrian Egli from the University of Basel in Switzerland - publish their findings in the journal PLOS Pathogens.

    Continue Reading
  • blog slide
    Mar 20, 2014

    Specific gene variant may influence effectiveness of flu vaccine, study finds

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, flu season is here. In line with National Influenza Vaccination Week from December 7th-13th, the organization is encouraging everyone over the age of 6 months to get the annual flu vaccine. But a new study finds that a variant in a gene called IL-28B may influence the effectiveness of the vaccine. A variant in the IL-28B gene may influence the immune system's response to the annual flu vaccine, according to researchers. The research team - including Adrian Egli from the University of Basel in Switzerland - publish their findings in the journal PLOS Pathogens.

    Continue Reading
  • blog slide
    Mar 20, 2014

    Specific gene variant may influence effectiveness of flu vaccine, study finds

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, flu season is here. In line with National Influenza Vaccination Week from December 7th-13th, the organization is encouraging everyone over the age of 6 months to get the annual flu vaccine. But a new study finds that a variant in a gene called IL-28B may influence the effectiveness of the vaccine. A variant in the IL-28B gene may influence the immune system's response to the annual flu vaccine, according to researchers. The research team - including Adrian Egli from the University of Basel in Switzerland - publish their findings in the journal PLOS Pathogens.

    Continue Reading
  • blog slide
    Mar 20, 2014

    Specific gene variant may influence effectiveness of flu vaccine, study finds

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, flu season is here. In line with National Influenza Vaccination Week from December 7th-13th, the organization is encouraging everyone over the age of 6 months to get the annual flu vaccine. But a new study finds that a variant in a gene called IL-28B may influence the effectiveness of the vaccine. A variant in the IL-28B gene may influence the immune system's response to the annual flu vaccine, according to researchers. The research team - including Adrian Egli from the University of Basel in Switzerland - publish their findings in the journal PLOS Pathogens.

    Continue Reading